Volume 5: Call for Papers – ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’

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VOLUME 5: CALL FOR PAPERS
‘Representations and
Recollections of Empire’

Cerae invites essay submissions on the theme of ‘Representations and Recollections of
Empire’. In its broadest sense, empire as a term is used to describe a state or cluster of
lands and states ruled by a monarch or emperor. With its implications of wide and far
reaching dominion, empire as a concept also lends itself to a broad range of subject
areas that may consider a number of cultural groups and historical periods, concepts of
power and dominance, influence and control. Topics may include but are not limited to:

• representations of cultural legacy and achievement in claims to power
• studies in the visual, literary and material culture of empire
• the birth of Renaissance humanism with its focus on classical notions of civic duty
• religious appropriations of the imperial claim to political supremacy
• medieval romance and epic as genres innovating on classical styles and themes
• the imperialist legacy in early colonial propaganda.

 
As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of art
history, literature, politics, intellectual history, social studies and beyond. Articles should
be approximately 5000-7000 words. Further details regarding submission and author
guidelines including the journal style sheet can be found online at:
http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions.

Ceræ is delighted to offer two prizes each for Volume 5. The first prize, of $200 (AUD), will be awarded to the best article submitted by a graduate student, an is sponsored by the University of Western Australia Graduate Research School. This award may be given to either a themed or non-themed submission. The second prize, also of $200 (AUD), will be awarded to the best essay on the theme of ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’ by a graduate student or early-career researcher.

DEADLINE FOR THEMED ARTICLES: 30th NOVEMBER 2017.
Non-themed articles are welcome at any point in the year.

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Open Opportunities

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Administered from the University of Western Australia, Cerae is an open-access, peer reviewed journal directed by a committee of interstate and international graduate students and early career researchers. We are united in our commitment to open access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars.

Volunteering for Cerae will give you invaluable experience in operating a journal – from drafting calls for papers, to the review process, through to copyediting – all skills which will make you more competitive in the academic job market. It will also give you the chance to make a difference and work with a very passionate and dedicated team. To nominate yourself for a role, please email ceraejournal@gmail.com by 25th September 2017.

DEPUTY EDITOR
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to work closely with the Editor to prepare each volume for publication. The Deputy Editor will:
– Arrange the provisional screening and peer review of articles.
– Liaise between reviewers and authors to finalise articles for publication.
– Organise the typesetting and copyediting of articles.
This role requires <2 hours per week.

SECRETARY
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer, ideally based at the University of Western Australia, to take care of the administrative tasks involved in running the journal. The Secretary:
– Monitors our main email account
– Organises meetings, writes agendas, and takes minutes as needed
– Oversees our ‘virtual office’
– Maintains contact lists
This role requires a minimum of 2 hours per week.

TREASURER
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer, ideally based at the University of Western Australia, to take care of the accounting tasks involved in running the journal. The Treasurer:
– Keeps records of incoming/outgoing funds
– Organises payments and receipts as necessary
– Generates a basic financial report annually
– Disburses prizes to our winners
– Works closely with the Fundraising Officer
This role requires <1 hr weekly, especially between the EOFY and our AGM.

FUNDRAISING OFFICER
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to identify sources of funding to support the journal’s running costs. The Fundraising Officer will:
– Find and apply for prizes or grants aimed at graduate student organizations.
– Send fundraising letters to heads of departments/organizations soliciting sponsorship.
– Consider creative methods of raising funds.
This role requires <1 hour per week.

DEPUTY REVIEWS EDITOR
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to work alongside the Reviews Editor. The Deputy Reviews Editor will:
– Assist the Reviews Editor to identify publications, including digital works, for review.
– Work with the Reviews Editor to approach and liaise with reviewers.
– Perform other tasks as required, including assisting with the preparation of reviews for
submission to the Editor.
This role requires 1-2 hours per week.

Cerae Receives the Matilda Award

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Michael, Tara and Imogen accepting the Matilda Award

Cerae is proud to announce that we have been selected to receive the Bryant Stokes Matilda Award for Cultural Excellence, 2017. The Matilda Award recognises outstanding achievement in cultural pursuits and acknowledges the talents and hard work of the Cerae team and journal contributors. Michael Ovens, Tara Auty and Imogen Forbes-Macphail attended the ceremony to receive the reward on behalf of the team. We would like to thank everyone who has helped make this possible.

Cerae is currently accepting abstracts for our Leeds IMC 2018 panel ‘Memories of Empire’ at ceraejournal@gmail.com Deadline: 31st AUGUST 2017. More details can be found here.

CFP Leeds IMC 2018 Panel ‘Memories of Empire’

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CALL FOR PAPERS

‘Memories of Empire’

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2018, LEEDS

Cerae is sourcing submissions to participate in a panel focused on ‘Memories of Empire’ for the IMC Conference at the University of Leeds (2-5 July, 2018). The focus of our panel is on the ways in which individuals or collectives used, or were influenced by, recollections and remnants of the Roman Empire.

Medieval ideas about education and civic duty were heavily influenced by Roman authors, for example, while Roman ruins were continuously used in Medieval buildings. Medieval theologians constantly grappled with the legacy of their ancient pagan forebears, while poets and playwrights sought to establish authority and prestige by placing themselves in the classical tradition through emulation and imitation. In Medieval memories and imaginations, the Roman Empire served as not only a past point of reference, but as an aspirational destination. In our panel, we would like to explore the relationship between memory, imagination and destiny. Submissions might focus on – but are not limited to:

  • studies in the visual, literary and material culture of the Carolingian empire
  • the birth of Renaissance humanism with its focus on classical notions of civic duty
  • religious appropriations of the imperial claim to political supremacy
  • medieval romance and epic as genres innovating on classical styles and themes
  • the imperialist legacy in early colonial propaganda

Cerae is aiming to gather together panellists with varied disciplinary approaches, and submissions from scholars working in art history, literature, politics, intellectual history, social studies and beyond are encouraged.

Submissions by participants willing to write up their paper as an article for review and publication in 2018 as part of Cerae Volume 5 (of the same theme) will be prioritised. We can offer bursaries of $100 towards travel costs for postgraduates and ECRs travelling from Australia and New Zealand.

PLEASE SEND A 250-300 WORD ABSRACT ALONG WITH A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY/PUBLICATIONS LIST TO ceraejournal@gmail.com BY 31st AUGUST 2017.

Women’s History Month – Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrucken

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How were medieval noble women involved in the transmission of secular literature? Stephanie Hathaway shares an example with us to celebrate Women’s History Month.

The Chanson de la reine Sébile exists in 13th-century alexandrine fragments, which are the oldest and only known metrical version of the story in existence.  They were found in bindings and MS covers, some heavily damaged.  Most are at the Bibliotheque Royale in Brussels.  These fragments comprise varying dialects, mostly Lorraine and Anglo-Norman. Much of the content of the text can be attested in the Spanish historia. A prose translation of this story into German, in the form of Königin Sibille, was written by a woman: Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrücken.

Born Elisabeth of Lorraine-Vaudémont between 1429-1453, she was the daughter of Marguerite of Joinville whose parents were the heirs of Champagne and Marie of Luxembourg.  Elisabeth’s father was the multi-titled lord of Lorraine, Baron of Vaudémont who also held land in Picardie and died in 1415 at the Battle of Agincourt.

About 1412, Elisabeth was married to Philipp, Baron of Nassau-Saarbrücken lord of Commercy on Maas and Merenberg in Taunus.  In 1425, when her son, Baron Johann III, was only 11, Philipp died at 61 and Elisabeth became regent.  She excelled at the task, strengthening political and religious ties and securing the inheritance for her son during a precarious time for the barony, caught between French, English and German interests.  Much of her correspondence survives, attesting to her involvement in administrative affairs, as well as to her literacy.

Elisabeth was familiar with literature from an early age.  When she was 11 her mother had Lohier et Malart translated from Latin into French for her.  She was fluent in both French and German.  Elisabeth was already forty years old when she produced prose translations of four chansons de geste, as a cycle from the life of Charlemagne to Hugh Capet, intended for her son.  Alone among the sparse German versions of Reine Sébile that exist, Elisabeth’s is the only one in the ‘French family’.

The surviving text that we have from Elisabeth helps fill in gaps in the reception history of the epic material, as well as attesting to the mobility of this material across linguistic, political and cultural boundaries of the Middle Ages. Elisabeth’s legacy leaves us a picture of not only the literacy of noble women, but their ability to participate in the arena of politics and administration that has been generally, and perhaps incorrectly viewed as an exclusively male domain.

 

 

Listening to the Gaoler’s Daughter

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From whence come ideas? Kendra Leonard explores the origins of her new article (now live on the Cerae website) in this guest blog.

My article about song and meaning in The Two Noble Kinsmen came about through my already-existing research interest in Shakespeare and music and a symposium held on Two Noble Kinsmen organized by my friend and colleague Niamh O’Leary at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. My 2009 book Shakespeare, Madness, and Music: Scoring Insanity in Cinematic Adaptations examined the relationships between madness and music in film versions of Shakespeare’s three political tragedies—Hamlet, Macbeth, and King Lear. But there is madness—or the simulacrum thereof—in many of Shakespeare’s other plays as well, and I wanted to examine the supposedly mad vocality of the Gaoler’s Daughter in particular.

The Two Noble Kinsmen is based on Chaucer’s “The Knight’s Tale” from The Canterbury Tales and was first published in 1634. Two previous plays had taken this tale as their source: Richard Edwardes’s Palamon and Arcite from 1566, written for the young Elizabeth I, and an anonymous version that was played in 1594 by the Admiral’s Men. These works focused on the story of the aristocratic cousins divided by their love for the same woman and did not include the secondary plot line of the Gaoler’s Daughter and her love of Palamon. Scholars believe that the schoolmaster and his coterie were based on Francis’s Beaumont’s Masque of the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn from 1613. Despite a title page stating that the play was by ‘Mr. Iohn Fletcher, and Mr. William Shakespeare. Gent,’ Shakespeare’s involvement was often dismissed, and authorship was given to Fletcher and Beaumont. Recent research divides up the play between Fletcher and Shakespeare, assigning Act 1, scenes 1–3; Act 2, scene 1; Act 3, scene 1; Act 5, scene 1, lines 34-173, and scenes 3 and 4 to Shakespeare, the Prologue; Act 2, scenes 2–6; Act 3, scenes 2–6; Act 4, scenes 1 and 3; Act 5, scene 1, lines 1–33, and scene 2; and the Epilogue to Fletcher. The authorship of Act 1, scenes 4-5 and Act 5, scene 2 remains undecided. The songs sung by the Gaoler’s Daughter are contemporary ballads and broadside tunes that would likely have been well-known to audiences. That the Daughter knows so many ballads suggests that she is an avid collector of them—if not in print, then in aural memory.

Because of its later entry into the canon of Shakespeare’s plays, The Two Noble Kinsmen has not been produced as frequently as Shakespeare’s other works. To this date, it remains one of the few plays that has not been adapted for television or cinema. However, there are several recordings of professional, university, and amateur productions online. Many of these are particularly interesting for their treatments of the Gaoler’s Daughter’s songs. Often, actors and directors use the music for these songs as provided in Ross Duffin’s Shakespeare’s Songbook (Norton, 2004). Others sing the song texts to melodies of their own composition or improvisation. In some cases, the Gaoler’s Daughter sings fragments of music rather than entire melodies, and in an especially excellent performance of the play by students at Victoria University in Wellington, the Gaoler’s Daughter incorporates bits of song and speech together, creating a Sprechstimme effect that truly conveys the character’s emotional distress and gradual healing. Yet other productions bring new music into their stagings, such as the Brave Spirits Theatre did in 2014, using songs by Billy Idol (“White Wedding”) and Ingrid Michaelson (“The Chain”), among others.

Regardless of what kind of music is used, the Gaoler’s Daughter has much to say through it, and her songs provide alert audiences with a narrative too often overlooked.

Read Kendra’s article, ‘Listening to the Gaoler’s Daughter’, for free by clicking here!

Cross-Cultural Exchange in the Renaissance

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Behind every great book likes a great culture. In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Lisa Tagliaferri explores the intricate relationship between text and translation in the Renaissance.

Translation is a careful act of negotiation across not only language but culture, which becomes even more pronounced when we approach historical documents from a contemporary perspective. The work that is done to make a new text in the target language perform the same function as the source text seems remarkably similar to the kind of work that Baldassare Castiglione’s conception of the courtier must do: strike a balance between subtle nuance and astute daring, and achieve a certain amount of that untranslatable quality: sprezzatura.

Castiglione’s The Courtier, a bestseller of the early modern period that warranted an English translation by Thomas Hoby, continuously invites analysis with its broad scope that considers court life, laughter, and metaphysics. The historical setting makes the piece even more interesting, which is addressed throughout the book and in the preceding letter to Signor Don Michel de Silva, the Bishop of Viseu, and taken up again in Hoby’s rendition which includes an extra epistle of the translator, addressed to Lord Henry Hastings.

The letters are fascinating to me because they add an extra texture to the books, leaving substantial traces of the interpersonal relationships that live on the periphery of the texts. As I have studied Vittoria Colonna’s writing in the past, her mention in each Castiglione’s and Hoby’s introductory letters piqued my interest. Book III of The Courtier has served as a point of inquiry and often contention for feminist criticism (for good reason), and I was intrigued by the ways in which that section seemed to pivot off of the relationship that Castiglione had with Colonna, and that Hoby had with Elizabeth Parr.

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Baldassare Castiglione and Vittoria Colonna

The correspondence between Castiglione and Colonna that took place outside of the books of The Courtier fueled my interest even more, as I considered this external material alongside the Renaissance classic. Realizing that Colonna was very much staking a claim as a literary critic of the text herself, while also serving to fuel the revision and publication process of the book, placed her in a paradoxical position that was both crucial to the eventual text yet challenged her friendship with Castiglione. Her situation, and that of her corollary Elizabeth Parr, present a feminine foil for the courtier, as individuals who both wield a certain amount of power and leverage an absence of power in an endeavor to advance their careers.

There is a growing interest in cases of cross-cultural exchange throughout the global Renaissance, and the transmission of texts between Italy and England is an area ripe for investigation. Additional inquiries into the texts produced by Castiglione and Hoby would certainly broaden our understanding of these works, as well as deepen our historical knowledge of both the Italian and English cultures of the early modern period.

Read Lisa’s article, ‘A Gentlewoman of the Court: Introducing and Translating the Court Lady’, for free by clicking here!