Call for Papers for “Words, Signs and Feelings”, and Non-Themed Submissions

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is excited to open its call for papers for Volume 3 (2016). Articles are welcome on any topic relating to Medieval and Early Modern studies, in any discipline.

In addition, Volume 3 will contain a themed section on the topic “Words, Signs, and Feelings”, to be interpreted in any way the author sees fit. Authors wishing to be considered for the themed section of Volume 3, or the prizes listed below, must submit their articles by 20 November 2015; however, non-themed articles will continue to be accepted throughout the year. Possible topics for the ‘Words, Signs and Feelings’ strand include, but are not limited to:

  • Representations and depictions of emotions and feelings in words, images, music, architecture and other expressive arts.
  • Emotional states prompted by and responsive to religious experiences
  • Manifestation of emotional states in physical symptoms and/or the diagnosis of disease
  • Affective responses to words, images or music by individuals or groups
  • Architecture and the affects of place
  • Literary theory and the reception of Medieval and Early Modern texts
  • Contemporary reception/adaption of Medieval and Early Modern thought, texts and ideas

Prizes

We are delighted to announce two prizes of $200 each to be awarded to articles published in Volume 3:

Best Essay Published in Volume 3
Thanks to the support of the University of Western Australia (UWA) Postgraduate Students Association and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, we will be awarding a prize of $200 to the best article published on any topic related to the theme of “Words, Signs and Feelings” in Volume 3, by a graduate student or early career researcher (five years out from PhD completion).

Best Essay Published in Volume 3 on a topic relating to the History of Emotions
The Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of the Emotions is generously sponsoring one prize for the best essay, in either the themed or non-themed sections, on any topic relating to the History of Emotions, by a graduate student or early career researcher.

Submissions: Please submit articles at our online portal. Articles should be approximately 5000 to 7000 words, and conform to MHRA guidelines for referencing.

Publication: Ceræ publishes articles on a rolling basis, as soon as they successfully pass the double-blind peer-review process and copyediting stages. The first few articles for Volume 2 are already available online; we expect seven articles to be published in Volume 2 by the end of December.

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Congratulations to our Essay Prize winners

We are delighted to announce that this year the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Western Australia Essay Prize has been awarded jointly to Andrea Brady and David Thorley, for their contributions to Volume 1: Emotions in History.

Andrea Brady, Professor of Poetry at Queen Mary University of London, has been recognised for her excellent article, ‘The Physics of Melting in Early Modern Poetry’.

Abstract
Melting is a familiar trope in early modern erotic poetry, where it can signify the desire to transform the beloved from icy chastity through the warmth of the lover’s passion. However, this Petrarchan convention can be defamiliarised by thinking about the experiences of freezing and melting in this period. Examining melting in the discourses of early modern meteorology, medicine, proverb, scientific experiments, and preservative technologies, as well as weather of the Little Ice Age and the exploration of frozen hinterlands, this essay shows that our understanding of seeming constants – whether they be the physical properties of water or the passions of love – can be modulated through attention to the specific histories of cognition and of embodiment.

Read the article

David Thorley, who recently received his doctorate from the University of Durham, likewise contributed an outstanding article entitled ‘The Melancholy of Henry More’. You can also read David’s guest post on this topic on the Ceræ blog here.

Abstract
This article treats Henry More’s philosophical approach to melancholy and his personal experience of the disease. Koen Vermeir argues that, in approaching the imagination philosophically, More was performing a ‘balancing act’ between addressing the subject as a medium between soul and body, and regarding it as a non-corporeal vehicle of reason and the spirit. ‘In his life’, Vermeir adds, ‘More was also performing a balancing act’: both an opponent of and subject to enthusiasm. In this article, I give closer scrutiny to that balancing act, charting the points of distinction and overlap between More’s philosophy of and encounters with melancholy. In the search for relief for his symptoms, I argue, More deployed two significant (and related) techniques: practicing philosophy and engaging in epistolary correspondence.

Read the article

Although the prize committee has chosen to distinguish these two authors, we would like to recognise the high quality of the other contributions to the first volume. We are looking forward to publishing Volume 2: Transitions, Fractions and Fragments throughout 2015, and would like to remind readers that we accept non-themed submissions at any time throughout the year.

Ceræ is committed to open-access publishing, exploring the possibilities of the digital humanities, and forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the Australasian region. If you would like to support our publication of this journal, and assist us to continue offering prizes to recognise our contributors, you can make a pledge through PayPal, or contact the editor at editorcerae@gmail.com.

Volume 1 (2014): Emotions in History Launch!

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is delighted to present its inaugural issue on the theme of ‘Emotions in History’, now available online at http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/issue/current. The contributions to this volume cover an exciting (and impressive) range of subjects which is a testament to the complexity and scope of this topic—watch this blog for future feature discussions on individual articles. We are also pleased to be able to present a number of reviews of both books and digital humanities projects.

We are also happy to announce that the deadline for submissions to Volume 2 has now been extended to 15 October, and that we are currently accepting both non-themed contributions, and submissions on the theme of ‘Transitions, Fractures and Fragments’. Submissions can be made online. Thanks to the generosity of the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at UWA, we will be offering a prize of $400 for the best article by a graduate student or early career researcher published in this volume.

Volume 1 Contents:

ARTICLES
Please Let This Be Much Ado about Nothing: ‘Kill Claudio’ and the Laughter of Release
Sarah Antinora

The Physics of Melting in Early Modern Love Poetry
Andrea Brady

‘In No Respect Can Contraries be True’: Passion and Reason in Marlowe’s Edward II
Christine Edwards

‘L’orage des passions’: Expressing Emotion on the Eighteenth-Century French Single-action Harp
Hannah Lane

Peasant Anger and Violence in the Writings of Orderic Vitalis
Kate McGrath

‘There is more to the story than this, of course’: Character and Affect in Philippa Gregory’s The White Queen
Laura Saxton

The Melancholy of Henry More
David Thorley

REVIEWS
Review: Broadside Ballads Online
Marcus Harmes

Review: Wiktenauer
Michael Ovens

Review: Thomas Meyer’s Beowulf
Jane-Anne Denison

Review: Nothing Natural is Shameful: Sodomy and Science in Late Medieval Europe
Melissa Michele Russell

Review: Emotions and Health, 1200-1700
Mark Neuendorf

Review: Blind Impressions: Methods and Mythologies in Book History
Alana Bennett

Review: Writing and Reading in Medieval Manuscript Culture
Kelly Midgley

Review: Emotional Excess on the Shakespearean Stage: Passion’s Slaves
Brid Mary Phillips

Review: The Book of Nature and Humanity in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance
James L. Smith

Review: Friendship and Social Networks in Scandinavia, c.1000-1800
Deborah Seiler

Review: Shame and Honour: A Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter
Hilary Jane Locke

Extended Deadline: Ceræ, Issue 2 – ‘Transitions, Fractures, and Fragments’

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is excited to announce a two-week extension of the deadline for submissions to its second issue, to be published in 2015. The new deadline is October 15th, 2014.

Ceræ is a peer-reviewed Australasian journal of medieval and early modern studies. Administered from the University of Western Australia with the generous support of faculty and staff, the journal is directed by a committee of Australian and international graduate students and early career researchers united in our commitment to open-access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the region. Ceræ accepts manuscripts from any discipline related to medieval and early modern studies, including submissions with accompanying audio-visual material.

Thanks to the generosity of the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at UWA, we are pleased to offer a prize of $400 for the best article by a graduate student or early career researcher published in this issue.

The theme for Volume 2 is “Transitions, Fractures, and Fragments,” to be interpreted in any way the author sees fit. Ceræ is also accepting non-themed submissions for publication.

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words.

Submissions should be made online at: http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions.

For further information, please contact editorcerae@gmail.com.

Call For Papers: ‘Transitions, Fractures, and Fragments’ in the Medieval and Early Modern – One Month Left

There is still one month to submit papers for the second issue of Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Submissions close on 1 October 2014 and the theme is ‘Transitions, Fractures, and Fragments’, to be interpreted in any way the author sees fit. We are also accepting non-themed submissions for publication.

As if such a great theme like that alone is not enticement enough, we are also please to offer a prize of $400 for the best article by a graduate student or early career researcher published in the issue, thanks for the generosity of the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Western Australia.

About Ceræ

Ceræ is a peer-reviewed Australasian journal of medieval and early modern studies. Administered from the University of Western Australia with the generous support of faculty and staff, the journal is directed by a committee of Australian and international graduate students and early career researchers united in our commitment to open-access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the region. Ceræ accepts manuscripts from any discipline related to medieval and early modern studies, including submissions with accompanying audio-visual material.

Submission requirements

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words and are due by 1 October 2014. They should be formatted according to the Ceræ Style Sheet. Submissions should be made online at: http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions

For further information, please contact editorcerae@gmail.com.

EXTENDED DEADLINE (14 Nov 2013): Call for Papers

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 14 NOVEMBER 2013

Emotions in History: Ceræ, an Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies would like to invite submissions for its inaugural issue on the theme ‘Emotions in History’, sponsored by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. Submissions are welcomed from scholars working in any discipline related to the medieval and early modern world, including representations of the medieval and early modern eras in later culture.

Emotions drive individual actions and effect broader social change. The way they are felt, expressed and performed evolves over time, and in exploring the way these emotions were experienced in their historical context, we can both gain a better understanding of how past societies understood their experience, and how this has influenced the way we experience emotions today.

We are particularly interested in submissions which engage with the growing field of the digital humanities, and are happy to work with authors to accommodate any requirements involving multimedia or alternative formatting. We also encourage submissions from authors working on emotions in performance and material culture. All submissions will be peer-reviewed by qualified experts in the field.

The ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Western Australia are generously funding a prize for the best article published in this issue.

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words and formatted according to the Cerae Style SheetPlease include a 200 word abstract along with your article. Submissions should be made using our Open Journal Systems Website or sent to editorcerae@gmail.com by 14 November 2013.

Call for Papers – From Byzantium to Clontarf: Emotional, Intellectual and Spiritual Perceptions in the Construction and Reception of the Early Medieval Past

From Byzantium to Clontarf: Emotional, Intellectual and Spiritual Perceptions in the Construction and Reception of the Early Medieval Past
The 10th conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association (AEMA)
Macquarie University, Sydney
7–8 February, 2014

AEMA

AEMA’s 10th conference spans the eight centuries from late antiquity through to the twelfth century, extending from the Byzantine capital of Constantinople in the East to Ireland in the West, and all areas in between. Impressions of the early medieval world over this period and region are based on sources that capture the emotional, intellectual, cultural or religious perceptions and biases of their creators.

2014 marks the 1000th anniversary of two important early medieval battles, Clontarf in the West and Kleidion in the East. Accounts of events, including battles like Clontarf and Kleidion are often highly subjective and emotionally charged, while modern cultural, intellectual, political, and religious sentiments can influence our reading of sources and our perceptions of events of the early medieval past. These events can then sometimes take on new meaning or symbolism for later audiences, just as perceptions of the battles of Clontarf and Kleidion and their aftermath have shifted over the last millennium.

This conference invites papers that address the emotional, intellectual, spiritual, or cultural aspects of written and non-written sources of the Late Antique and Early Medieval periods (c. 400–1150).  Priority will be given to papers which relate to the conference theme but submissions related to any aspect of the early medieval world will be considered. Papers on the reception of events of this period by non-contemporary writers and artists are also welcome, particularly the role played by emotion, intellect, politics, culture, or religion in framing the ways in which societies or individuals view their past.

Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be sent to conference@aema.net.au by 11 October 2013.

Limited financial assistance may be available for postgraduates and early career researchers travelling interstate for this conference and there will also be a prize for the Best Postgraduate/ECR paper at the conference (AEMA membership required).

For more information, see the conference website or contact the convenors, Janet Wade and Nicole Moffatt, at conference@aema.net.au.