Open Opportunities

Even while we are busy working on volume 5, we are thinking ahead to volume 6, and it would be amazing if you would join us! Some of our brilliant editorial team are moving on and some of us are eager for a new challenge within Cerae. This means that there are opportunities for eager new committee members. Please see the advert below for details and don’t hesitate to contact us at ceraejournal@gmail.com with any questions.

Cerae Committee Positions

 

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Winner winner!

Cerae are pleased to announce the winner of our volume four essay prize.  This prize was awarded to an article submitted under our volume four theme of Influence and Appropriation.  We published two articles related to this theme, and it was a very hard decision as to whom the prize should be awarded, as both articles were of excellent quality and hugely interesting.  The committee have decided to award this year’s prize to Jocelyn Hargrave for her article ‘Aphra Behn: Cultural Translator and Editorial Intermediary.’

Jocelyn’s article, which draws on her PhD research on the evolution of editorial practice in early modern England, struck a particular chord with the committee as editors ourselves.  It was interesting to draw parallels between modern editorial practices and those of one of our predecessors in the historical periods that we research.

Please join us in congratulating Jocelyn.  As with all research published by Cerae, as an Open Access academic journal, her winning article is available to download for free by any interested party, so do go and have a read!

Tech Update!

Our wonderful web editor, Erica Steiner, has been an extremely busy bee in recent weeks, updating the Cerae website to make it more streamlined and easier to use.  You  should be able to find articles and blog posts with ease now – have a browse, let us know what you think.  All Cerae articles are open access and fully downloadable, so you can discover important new scholarship without university affiliation or nasty paywalls.

Erica has also created an academia.edu page for the journal.  This is a new platform for us to share articles, blog posts, news, and CfPs.  If you’re on the site, please follow us and we’ll follow you back!

And as ever, we’re active on twitter and facebook.  As a postgraduate researcher, social media has been a complete lifeline to me – twitter is where I find out about conferences, CfPs, developments in my field, but it is also where I have made friends who understand this wacky academic life.  Thank you to everyone who follows Cerae, comments on our posts, and generally makes social media a lovely and important place to be.

Leeds IMC 2018

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Are you excited?  We’re excited!  We’ll be up bright and early on Tuesday morning for the 9am session in the Parkinson building (Nathan Bodington Chamber – fancy!).  Join our esteemed editor, Vanessa Wright, and our four speakers – Philippa Byrne, Stephanie Hathaway, Celeste Andrews, and Sean Tandy – for some fantastic insights into Memories of Empire.

Cerae at Leeds IMC 2018!

Twitter was absolutely buzzing last week with excited medievalists announcing that their panel had been accepted for the International Medieval Congress in Leeds in July 2018.  I have already triple booked myself in some time slots with all the fantastic papers and panels that friends and colleagues have been tweeting.  And now we are excited to announce that Cerae has it’s very own panel, too!  Join us bright and early on the Tuesday morning for four fantastic papers on Memory and Empire, all specifically chosen to complement and enhance Volume 5’s thematic strand Representations and Recollections of Empire.  We’re so in sync, Cerae and the IMC – memory-recollections, recollections-memory.

Cerae’s panel discusses the ways in which individuals or collectives used, or were influenced by, recollections and remnants of the Roman Empire.  Medieval ideas about education and civic duty were heavily influenced by Roman authors, for example, while Roman ruins were continuously used in Medieval buildings. Medieval theologians constantly grappled with the legacy of their ancient pagan forebears, while poets sought to establish authority and prestige by placing themselves in the classical tradition through emulation and imitation. In Medieval memories and imaginations, the Roman Empire served as not only a past point of reference, but as an aspirational destination.

We have four diverse but beautifully complementary papers.  Philippa Byrne’s paper will focus on rhetoric and political thought in Sallust, while Stephanie Hathaway explores magic and pagan thought in the French Reine Sebile texts.  Celeste Andrews will treat us to a paper on the remembrance of Rome in medieval Welsh texts.  Sean Tandy will close the panel with a paper on authorship and authority in mis-attributed late antique texts.

In all our excitement, we’ve decided also to extend the deadline for thematic submissions for Volume 5.  If this panel has got you all fired up about Representations and Recollections of Empire, you now have until the end of December to send us a submission.

Everything you ever wanted to know about representations and recollections of empire

But we haven’t published it yet!  That’s where you come in.  The deadline is tomorrow, but we know that you’ve been working on your paper and are just waiting until the very last minute to press send – and please do!  We really want to read it, and publish it, and share it with the world.  Details can be found here: Call for papers!

Cerae is a peer-reviewed, open access academic journal, based in Australia but with committee members and contributors throughout the world (I, personally, live in Southampton, UK, which is currently 3 degrees celsius and feels about as far from the balmy beaches of Australia as possible).  We are volunteers, but work with the professionalism and rigour that you would expect from a top flight academic journal.  We are committed to sharing high quality research in all medieval and early modern subject areas, and strongly believe in the power of open access publishing and digital humanities to do that.  The medieval and early modern online community is strong (twitter is my daily saviour!), which some might find ironic, given that we study the past, but it is actually incredibly apt, as those periods were so innovative in their thinking and methods of sharing knowledge.  Let’s carry on the tradition!

Volume 3 Winners

We are delighted to announce the winners of the essay competitions for Volume 3 of Cerae.

Lisa Tagliaferri won the prize for Best Themed Essay, with the theme of the issue being ‘Words, Signs, and Feelings’.  Tagliaferri’s article, ”A Gentlewoman of the Courte’: Introducing and Translating the Court Lady’, explores the pro-feminist agenda, or lack of such, of Baldassarre Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier and its subsequent English translation by Thomas Hoby.  Tagliaferri argues that the book was presented as an appeasement to ladies within the court, but is actually a behavioural manual designed to retain masculine authority.

Matthew Firth won the prize for Best Essay Related to the History of Emotions, with his article Allegories of Sight: Blinding and Power in Late Anglo-Saxon England.  Firth’s essay details the use of blinding as a punitive punishment in Anglo-Saxon England, from an initial reluctance to employ such a debilitating disability to a recognition of its effectiveness in curtailing the power of one’s enemies.  Anglo-Saxon culture believed that sight was inherent to power, argues Firth, making the decision to blind a person particularly complex.

Both essays, and the rest of volume 3, are available on Cerae‘s website.  The deadline for themed submissions for volume 5 is 30th November, but non-themed essays are welcomed throughout the year.  The theme for volume 5 is Representations and Recollections of Empire.