Volume 5: Call for Papers – ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’

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VOLUME 5: CALL FOR PAPERS
‘Representations and
Recollections of Empire’

Cerae invites essay submissions on the theme of ‘Representations and Recollections of
Empire’. In its broadest sense, empire as a term is used to describe a state or cluster of
lands and states ruled by a monarch or emperor. With its implications of wide and far
reaching dominion, empire as a concept also lends itself to a broad range of subject
areas that may consider a number of cultural groups and historical periods, concepts of
power and dominance, influence and control. Topics may include but are not limited to:

• representations of cultural legacy and achievement in claims to power
• studies in the visual, literary and material culture of empire
• the birth of Renaissance humanism with its focus on classical notions of civic duty
• religious appropriations of the imperial claim to political supremacy
• medieval romance and epic as genres innovating on classical styles and themes
• the imperialist legacy in early colonial propaganda.
As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of art
history, literature, politics, intellectual history, social studies and beyond. Articles should
be approximately 5000-7000 words. Further details regarding submission and author
guidelines including the journal style sheet can be found online at:
http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions.

Ceræ is delighted to offer two prizes each for Volume 5. The first prize, of $200 (AUD), will be awarded to the best article submitted by a graduate student, an is sponsored by the University of Western Australia Graduate Research School. This award may be given to either a themed or non-themed submission. The second prize, also of $200 (AUD), will be awarded to the best essay on the theme of ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’ by a graduate student or early-career researcher.

DEADLINE FOR THEMED ARTICLES: 30th NOVEMBER 2017.
Non-themed articles are welcome at any point in the year.

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Open Opportunities

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Administered from the University of Western Australia, Cerae is an open-access, peer reviewed journal directed by a committee of interstate and international graduate students and early career researchers. We are united in our commitment to open access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars.

Volunteering for Cerae will give you invaluable experience in operating a journal – from drafting calls for papers, to the review process, through to copyediting – all skills which will make you more competitive in the academic job market. It will also give you the chance to make a difference and work with a very passionate and dedicated team. To nominate yourself for a role, please email ceraejournal@gmail.com by 25th September 2017.

DEPUTY EDITOR
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to work closely with the Editor to prepare each volume for publication. The Deputy Editor will:
– Arrange the provisional screening and peer review of articles.
– Liaise between reviewers and authors to finalise articles for publication.
– Organise the typesetting and copyediting of articles.
This role requires <2 hours per week.

SECRETARY
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer, ideally based at the University of Western Australia, to take care of the administrative tasks involved in running the journal. The Secretary:
– Monitors our main email account
– Organises meetings, writes agendas, and takes minutes as needed
– Oversees our ‘virtual office’
– Maintains contact lists
This role requires a minimum of 2 hours per week.

TREASURER
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer, ideally based at the University of Western Australia, to take care of the accounting tasks involved in running the journal. The Treasurer:
– Keeps records of incoming/outgoing funds
– Organises payments and receipts as necessary
– Generates a basic financial report annually
– Disburses prizes to our winners
– Works closely with the Fundraising Officer
This role requires <1 hr weekly, especially between the EOFY and our AGM.

FUNDRAISING OFFICER
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to identify sources of funding to support the journal’s running costs. The Fundraising Officer will:
– Find and apply for prizes or grants aimed at graduate student organizations.
– Send fundraising letters to heads of departments/organizations soliciting sponsorship.
– Consider creative methods of raising funds.
This role requires <1 hour per week.

DEPUTY REVIEWS EDITOR
We are looking for a reliable, motivated volunteer to work alongside the Reviews Editor. The Deputy Reviews Editor will:
– Assist the Reviews Editor to identify publications, including digital works, for review.
– Work with the Reviews Editor to approach and liaise with reviewers.
– Perform other tasks as required, including assisting with the preparation of reviews for
submission to the Editor.
This role requires 1-2 hours per week.

Cerae Receives the Matilda Award

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Michael, Tara and Imogen accepting the Matilda Award

Cerae is proud to announce that we have been selected to receive the Bryant Stokes Matilda Award for Cultural Excellence, 2017. The Matilda Award recognises outstanding achievement in cultural pursuits and acknowledges the talents and hard work of the Cerae team and journal contributors. Michael Ovens, Tara Auty and Imogen Forbes-Macphail attended the ceremony to receive the reward on behalf of the team. We would like to thank everyone who has helped make this possible.

Cerae is currently accepting abstracts for our Leeds IMC 2018 panel ‘Memories of Empire’ at ceraejournal@gmail.com Deadline: 31st AUGUST 2017. More details can be found here.

CFP Leeds IMC 2018 Panel ‘Memories of Empire’

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CALL FOR PAPERS

‘Memories of Empire’

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2018, LEEDS

Cerae is sourcing submissions to participate in a panel focused on ‘Memories of Empire’ for the IMC Conference at the University of Leeds (2-5 July, 2018). The focus of our panel is on the ways in which individuals or collectives used, or were influenced by, recollections and remnants of the Roman Empire.

Medieval ideas about education and civic duty were heavily influenced by Roman authors, for example, while Roman ruins were continuously used in Medieval buildings. Medieval theologians constantly grappled with the legacy of their ancient pagan forebears, while poets and playwrights sought to establish authority and prestige by placing themselves in the classical tradition through emulation and imitation. In Medieval memories and imaginations, the Roman Empire served as not only a past point of reference, but as an aspirational destination. In our panel, we would like to explore the relationship between memory, imagination and destiny. Submissions might focus on – but are not limited to:

  • studies in the visual, literary and material culture of the Carolingian empire
  • the birth of Renaissance humanism with its focus on classical notions of civic duty
  • religious appropriations of the imperial claim to political supremacy
  • medieval romance and epic as genres innovating on classical styles and themes
  • the imperialist legacy in early colonial propaganda

Cerae is aiming to gather together panellists with varied disciplinary approaches, and submissions from scholars working in art history, literature, politics, intellectual history, social studies and beyond are encouraged.

Submissions by participants willing to write up their paper as an article for review and publication in 2018 as part of Cerae Volume 5 (of the same theme) will be prioritised. We can offer bursaries of $100 towards travel costs for postgraduates and ECRs travelling from Australia and New Zealand.

PLEASE SEND A 250-300 WORD ABSRACT ALONG WITH A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY/PUBLICATIONS LIST TO ceraejournal@gmail.com BY 31st AUGUST 2017.

2016 Call for Papers – “Influence and Appropriation”

Influence and Appropriation

CERAE: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is seeking contributions for its upcoming volume on the theme of “Influence and Appropriation”, to be published in 2017. We are, additionally, delighted to announce a prize of $200 for the best article published in this volume by a graduate student or early career researcher (details below).
Both individuals and entire cultural groups are influenced consciously and subconsciously as part of a receptive process, but they may actively respond to such influences by appropriating them for new purposes. Perhaps human beings cannot escape their influences, but think in terms of them regardless of whether they are taken as right or wrong, useful or otherwise. Such influences may have enduring effects on the lives of people and ideas, and may be co-opted for new social contexts to fit new purposes.
Contributors to this issue may consider some of the following areas:

  •     How writers adapt received ideas and novel conceptual frameworks or adapt to them
  •     How entire cultural groupings (national, vocational, socio-economic, religious, and so on) may be influenced by contact and exchange
  •     The mentorship and authority of ideas and people
  •     The use and abuse of old concepts for new polemics
  •     The shifting influence of canonical texts across time
  •     The way received ideas influence behaviours in specific situations
  •     How medieval and early modern ideas are reshaped for use in modern situations

 

These topics are intended as guides. Any potential contributors who are unsure about the suitability of their idea are encouraged to contact the journal’s editor (Keagan Brewer) at editorcerae@gmail.com.

The deadline for themed submissions is Friday 18th November, 2016. In addition to themed articles, however, we also welcome non-themed submissions, which can be made at any point throughout the year.

 

SUBMISSION DETAILS: 

Articles should be approximately 5000-7000 words. Further details regarding submission, including author guidelines and the journal’s style sheet, can be found online at http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/about/submissions.

 

PRIZES:

Cerae is delighted to announce a prize for the best article to be published in Volume 4 by a graduate student or early career researcher (defined as five years out from PhD completion), on the theme of ‘Influence and Appropriation’. Cerae is able to offer this prize thanks to the generosity of our sponsors. For a full list of organizations which have supported us in the past, see our list of sponsors. The journal reserves the right not to award a prize in any given year if no articles of sufficiently high standard are submitted.

 

ABOUT THE JOURNAL: 

Cerae is a peer-reviewed Australasian journal of medieval and early modern studies. Administered from the University of Western Australia, the journal is directed by a committee of Australian and international graduate students and early career researchers, united in our commitment to open-access publishing, the possibilities of the digital humanities, and to forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the region. Cerae accepts manuscripts from any discipline related to medieval and early modern studies, including submissions with accompanying audio-visual material. Previous issues of the journal can be viewed online at http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/issue/archive.

 

For further information, please contact editorcerae@gmail.com, or follow our blog at ceraejournal.com for news, updates and articles of general interest.

 

Opportunity Knocks!

Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies is looking for new graduate students and early career researchers to join the Executive and Extended Committees for Volume 4, to be published in 2017!

Extended Committee members are an essential part of the day-to-day running of the journal. Members can write posts for our blog ‘Impressions’, conduct preliminary reviews and copy-edits of submitted articles, receive first choice of books for review, and help generate publicity and reach for the journal as a whole. Membership is not limited to scholars working in the field of medieval and early modern studies, although scholars working in this field are particularly encouraged to apply.

Executive Committee members, meanwhile, play a more specific part in the journal by fulfilling the role of Editor, Deputy Editor, Reviews Editor, Social Media Editor, Secretary, Treasurer, or General Committee Members. Although new Extended Committee members are welcome at any time of the year, individuals interested in one of the Executive Committee roles are encouraged to get in touch as soon as possible before the roles are all filled!

If you’re interested in getting some valuable experience working with an academic journal (and adding a line to your CV!) then send us an e-mail at ceraejournal@gmail.com and we can have a chat about how you can best contribute to the growth and development of this exciting new journal.

Visit our website at: http://openjournals.arts.uwa.edu.au/index.php/cerae/index

Congratulations to our Volume 2 Essay Prize Winner

We are delighted to announce the winner of the Volume 2 prize for best article by a graduate student or early career researcher has been awarded to Richard Firth-Godbehere for his article “For ‘Physitians of the Soule’: The roles of ‘flight’ and ‘hatred of abomination’ in Thomas Wright’s The Passions of the Minde in Generall.

Abstract

This article attempts to understand how Thomas Wright’s 1604 work, The Passions of the Minde in Generall, might have fitted into his overall mission as an English Catholic preacher, particularly when read via Wright’s understanding of Thomas Aquinas’s passion of fuga seu abominatio. Some historians claim that Wright was a controversialist, previously describing The Passions as either a radical departure from Wright’s mission, or the work of a different Thomas Wright. Earlier attempts to find a missionary element within The Passions have been inadequate. Through a close reading of The Passions, specifically analysing Wright’ʹs interpretation of fuga seu abominatio within the context of Wright’s intended readership, the main message of The Passions, and his background, this article suggests a possible reading of the text as a work aimed specifically at fellow English Catholics. To Wright, the passions of hatred of abomination and flight or detestation, derived primarily from Aquinas’s fuga seu abominatio, were not simply a form of disgust, as often assumed, but the potential worldly or otherworldly harm that someone we love, such as a neighbour, might face from the abominable evil of sin and damnation. By linking hatred of abomination, flight or detestation, and Wright’s particular view of sin together, Wright was teaching English Catholics how these passions might be used to cure diseased souls, turning the work into a guide for preaching.

 We would like to congratulate all seven contributors to this volume for their exceptional work; their articles can be found in Volume 2: Transitions, Fractures, and Fragments. Special thanks are due to the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Western Australia who provided the funds necessary to offer this years’ prize. We are looking forward to publishing Volume 3: Words, Signs, and Feelings throughout 2016, and remind readers that we accept non-themed submissions at any time throughout the year.

Ceræ is committed to open-access publishing, exploring the possibilities of the digital humanities, and forging a strong community of medieval and early modern scholars in the Australasian region. If you would like to support our publication of this journal, and assist us to continue offering prizes to recognise our contributors, you can make a pledge through PayPal, or contact the editor at editorcerae@gmail.com.