Ceræ Volume 10: Call For Papers

In our tenth-anniversary year, Ceræ invites article submissions on the theme of memory. Memory is widely theorised in medieval and early modern studies in connection to how societies remember, perceive, and invent the past. Topics might include: Mnemonic objects, landscapes, rituals, prose and verse, etc. The interfaces between orality and literacy Cultural memory theory and … Continue reading Ceræ Volume 10: Call For Papers

Conference Review: 2022 Leeds IMC

The 2022 Leeds IMC marked the first year since the beginning of the pandemic when in-person sessions were able to be organized once again. I attended a short part of the conference as one of the moderators for the Ceræ session titled: In the Middle of What?: Period Boundaries in Medieval Studies, II. This was … Continue reading Conference Review: 2022 Leeds IMC

Volume 8 – Published!

After another challenging year globally, we are excited to bring our readers Volume 8 of Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. This volume contains two non-themed articles, two varias, and six book reviews. We are extremely proud of the work of the authors, the editorial committee, our book reviewers, the peer … Continue reading Volume 8 – Published!

Volume 7 Essay Prize Winner

Ceræ is pleased to announce that the winner of our Volume 7 essay prize is Dr. Emma Louise Barlow for her article, 'Emotional Minds and Bodies in the Suicide Narratives of Dante’s Inferno’ which discusses the dynamic role suicide plays in Dante's Inferno. We had excellent submissions for Volume 7 for the theme 'Minority and … Continue reading Volume 7 Essay Prize Winner

Catastrophe, cultural memory, and the ‘dust veil’ of 536

What can Old Norse accounts of Fimbulvetr (‘Great Winter’) tell us about cultural memory of the 'dust veil' of  536 throughout Europe? In his new article (now live on the Cerae website), Andrea Maraschi explores just that; he introduces his research for us here. But more than that, writing from Italy in the midst of the … Continue reading Catastrophe, cultural memory, and the ‘dust veil’ of 536

Sir Joseph Banks and the Medieval Icelandic Saga

In this article, our social media editor Matt Firth looks at the career of Joseph Banks (1743-1820), and the collection of Icelandic texts he left the British Library… For Australians, Joseph Banks (1743-1820) is a familiar name from our colonial history. In fact, I suspect that for most of us, setting aside James Cook, his … Continue reading Sir Joseph Banks and the Medieval Icelandic Saga

A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 1782

In this article, our editor Christina Cleary takes a look at BL MS Egerton 1782, a 16th century Irish manuscript that preserves Early Irish tales that have not otherwise survived the centuries… The vellum manuscript known as Egerton 1782, housed by the British Library, is an extremely valuable source for the study of Early Irish … Continue reading A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 1782

CFP Leeds IMC 2020 Panel: ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’

Call for Papers ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’ International Medieval Congress 2020, Leeds Ceræ: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies invites abstracts for papers on the theme of ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’ for the International Medieval Congress 2020. Recent scholarship has begun to acknowledge that the focus of Medieval and Early Modern Studies … Continue reading CFP Leeds IMC 2020 Panel: ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’

La Rochelle and the Roman de Melusine

In this article, our deputy reviews editor Kirsty Bolton takes a look at the medieval port town of La Rochelle, its legendary founder, and its fraught political history... In June, I spent a few days in La Rochelle, a medieval port town on the south west coat of France. It was supposed to be an anniversary trip … Continue reading La Rochelle and the Roman de Melusine

Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

How was the classical historian Sallust read in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and what does this reveal about medieval moral thought? These are the questions Philippa Byrne asks in her new article (now live on the Cerae website). Philippa introduces it for us here on the blog, taking a look at how the research … Continue reading Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture