Rudolf II and the Material Culture of the Holy Roman Empire

How did an emperor's interest in collecting art connect with representations of his cultural and imperial legacy? In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Miranda Lee Elston explores Rudolf II's fascination with the religious works of Albrecht Dürer – she introduces her article, and her research more widely, for us here… I am a Ph.D. … Continue reading Rudolf II and the Material Culture of the Holy Roman Empire

Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

How was the classical historian Sallust read in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and what does this reveal about medieval moral thought? These are the questions Philippa Byrne asks in her new article (now live on the Cerae website). Philippa introduces it for us here on the blog, taking a look at how the research … Continue reading Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

Æthelstan and Cnut – Emperors or Kings?

Should we consider the most ambitious Anglo-Saxon kings as reigning over ‘empires’, or are historians misusing that term? In his new article (now live on the Cerae website), Matt Firth examines ‘empires’ as a category of power in political theory and questions whether it is an appropriate term for the hegemonies of the Kings Æthelstan and Cnut... … Continue reading Æthelstan and Cnut – Emperors or Kings?

Einhard and the Writing of Vita Karoli Magni

How did early medieval scholars interpret and adapt the histories of Imperial Rome? In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Minjie Su explores the composition of, and intertextuality within, Vita Karoli Magni (The Life of Charlemagne) - she introduces it for us here... I find that, in order to write about the article … Continue reading Einhard and the Writing of Vita Karoli Magni

Conference Review – ANZAMEMS, University of Sydney

In this guest article, Daniel Johnson reflects on the recent conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS) at the University of Sydney. I am a part-time PhD student from the UK, studying the theology of the hymns of Isaac Watts (1674-1784) at the University of Leicester. I … Continue reading Conference Review – ANZAMEMS, University of Sydney

Aphra Behn: Cultural Translator and Editorial Intermediary

Here Dr. Jocelyn Hargrave of Monash University shares with us a fascinating insight into the connections between academia and publishing, and how working in both fields has informed her research.  Her article "Aphra Behn: Cultural Translator and Editorial Intermediary" has just been published in Volume 4 of Cerae Journal. Editing, specifically, and making books, more … Continue reading Aphra Behn: Cultural Translator and Editorial Intermediary

Metaphor and Meaning

With the publication of volume 4, 'Influence and Appropriation', we've asked our fantastic contributors to write a blog post about their work.  First up is Jenny Smith, whose paper explores the influential power of metaphor in early modern literature.  Her article can be found here: Necessary Abuse: the Mirror as Metaphor in the Sixteenth Century … Continue reading Metaphor and Meaning

Women’s History Month – Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrucken

How were medieval noble women involved in the transmission of secular literature? Stephanie Hathaway shares an example with us to celebrate Women's History Month. The Chanson de la reine Sébile exists in 13th-century alexandrine fragments, which are the oldest and only known metrical version of the story in existence.  They were found in bindings and … Continue reading Women’s History Month – Elisabeth von Nassau-Saarbrucken

Listening to the Gaoler’s Daughter

From whence come ideas? Kendra Leonard explores the origins of her new article (now live on the Cerae website) in this guest blog. My article about song and meaning in The Two Noble Kinsmen came about through my already-existing research interest in Shakespeare and music and a symposium held on Two Noble Kinsmen organized by my … Continue reading Listening to the Gaoler’s Daughter

Cross-Cultural Exchange in the Renaissance

  Behind every great book likes a great culture. In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Lisa Tagliaferri explores the intricate relationship between text and translation in the Renaissance. Translation is a careful act of negotiation across not only language but culture, which becomes even more pronounced when we approach historical documents … Continue reading Cross-Cultural Exchange in the Renaissance